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By Philip W. Anderson

Easy Notions of Condensed subject Physics is a transparent creation to a couple of the main major thoughts within the physics of condensed subject. the overall ideas of many-body physics and perturbation conception are emphasized, delivering supportive mathematical constitution. this can be a ramification and restatement of the second one half Nobel Laureate Philip Anderson’s vintage options in Solids.

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Basic notions of condensed matter physics

Simple Notions of Condensed subject Physics is a transparent creation to a couple of the main major thoughts within the physics of condensed subject. the final ideas of many-body physics and perturbation concept are emphasized, supplying supportive mathematical constitution. this can be a diffusion and restatement of the second one 1/2 Nobel Laureate Philip Anderson’s vintage strategies in Solids.

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Why are some materials brittle and others ductile? Alternatively, why do some materials crack and others undergo plastic deformation? A simple answer is that the behaviour depends on the type of bond present in the, material. Metals are ductile because the. atoms are not particular about which atom they bond with, and therefore the dislocations can move easily. Similarly, some molecular solids, such as polymers, are ductile because the molecules can slide over one another. In comparison, most other materials are brittle because the dislocations are not mobile.

There are various ways of calculating this stress (for examples, see Tabor, pp. 1Y, where Yis Young's modulus. This result is similar in magnitude to the predicted value of yield stress in ductile materials, and again it is found to be a gross overestimate of the measured value. However, the cause of the discrepancy must be different-it cannot be due to the presence of dislocations because the material does not undergo plastic deformation. So why is the breaking stress so small? To answer this, let us consider a familiar example.

A:: X-~;'diff;~;i;~--- The intercepts on the axes in units of a, b and c are 3, 1 and 2, respectively. , respectively. The smallest set of integers with the same common ratio are 2, 6, 3. Consequently, we can label the plane a (263) plane. So far in this chapter we have examined the structure of crystals trom a purely theoretical viewpoint. How do we know that these ideas are correct? Can we determine experimentally how the atoms are arranged in a crystal? We certainly cannot see the atoms in a crystal using a conventional optical microscope.

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